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Dating and Borderlands: The Do’s and Don’t’s


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Sometimes video games bring people together. Sometimes they encourage rock throwing.

Borderlands is one of the wonderful games that allow you and three of your besties to take on challenges, defeat chaos and share in the plentiful bounty of friendship treasure. And what better way to do that than through a fantastic co-op game with some of the best ratings in modern history? So I figured, hey! This has brought my friends and I closer, why not play a campaign with my long distance girlfriend and bring us closer together? Genius idea, right?

Not quite, but getting there.

20140522-180707-65227179.jpgShe looks kinda like this.

First, a brief background: my beautiful girlfriend (She’s a nine, I’m a six) has been my better half for over five years now. Most of that time, she has attended school about 20 minutes from Canada in Northern New York and I reside in Queens. I picked her up a 360 on an anniversary and it was the first system she didn’t have to share.

So during her winter break, I grabbed her an early present: a copy of Borderlands: Game of the Year Edition and we started playing the campaign on Live.

We learned some valuable lessons from it, and to save anyone the trouble of learning them from the screaming, yelling and general discomfort we went through, here’s a quick list of do’s and don’t’s of cooperative video games with someone you’re dating for you to save yourself from tinnitus follow!

DON’T! Get Competitive!

20140522-180707-65227533.jpgNot a happy relationship…I think…

I’ve been gaming since I was two, research my tactics and my in-game FPS movement has been compared to a Marine. By a Marine. (Shout out to my buddy Mike V. for making me feel cooler!). My lady: her first FPS was CoD Black Ops. If you allow competition, one of two things happen; you massacre and get yelled at, or you turn it down, they somehow know, and you still get yelled at. Turn off duels. Know it’s the right thing to do.

DO! Let Your S.O. Pick a Class First!

20140522-180706-65226883.jpgAll great, but everyone has their preference…

Good Co-op games usually feature four well balanced classes, and generally none of them are bad, they’re all just different! Plus, chances are there’s a new class for you to try anyway. So let your better half choose first. Plus, it saves you the trouble of arguing about who should get to be Mordecai (should have been me, but whatever…)

DON’T! Make Fun of Your Hunny’s Skill!

20140522-180707-65227474.jpgYou got this, but is it worth it?

Assuming you too are the more experienced player, it’s best to keep your frustrations over your partner in crime’s playing skills. One, they’ll be upset and not talk to you for a week. Two, they’ll leave the room and your treasure will suck a bit more. Three, they get better: in Fyrestone, my darling couldn’t hit a stationary target ten meters away with a sniper rifle. By the time we hit the Dahl Headlands, every shot was a critical hit, even on moving Rakks, and I started blocking her view to have a *chance* to do some shotgun damage.

DO! Share the loot fairly!

20140522-180707-65227564.jpgAlso true for Co-op games.

It’s a good rule to pick one or two weapon types that will automatically be given to the one who selects them. Each character has a single weapon that suits them, but the second one can be tougher. Keep your selection balanced and you should be good with just the two. This also comes in handy when your ally makes comments in real life, like “you don’t share” and “you never get me stuff!”

DON’T! Complain about internet connection!

20140522-180707-65227598.jpgSometimes it feels like this.

My girlfriend has a standard cable modem she shares with five schoolmates. I pay an extra $20 a month and hiss at people who come near my house with a wifi device. You need to realize someone is going to have connection issues at times and it’s better to accept that and move on than attack each other over who’s completely obvious, shared, pretty and leggy modem it is.

^_^

This is a small list of things to avoid, and there may be more to come, assuming we play more this summer and/or I’m not murdered for posting this article, but check back for more!

Any other tips for multiplayer with a significant other? Drop your comments below and share them (PLEASE!!!)

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About RedGuinness

Andrew Shortall (RedGuinness) is the Writer, Editor, Administrator and founder of Stay-At-Home Gaming. He also suffers from sleepless nights, summer new release withdrawals and trying to behave himself in front of his new nephew.

3 comments on “Dating and Borderlands: The Do’s and Don’t’s

  1. richardwbest
    May 23, 2014

    Nominating you for Liebster Award. Lucky you! look for it here: http://richardwbest.wordpress.com

  2. Sarca
    May 24, 2014

    Yes, to all the above. The hubs and I cut my “co-op” teeth on Borderlands more than any game. All I have to say is “patience.” If your SO doesn’t understand about switching out weapons, time to sit and explain – nicely and calmly. And give them a chance to shoot and kill too so they can level up. They’ll get it sooner or later with practice. You follow that and your SO will feel like a true gamer that can play with the big boyz in no time! Also, Borderlands is a great game for SO co-op – interesting characters, beautiful landscape, a lot to see and do. If nothing else, these things kept me wanting more.

  3. Pingback: Around the Web – 6/1/14 | The Credible Hulk

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This entry was posted on May 23, 2014 by in Editorial, Gaming Non-Fiction and tagged , , , , , .

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